Journal Article Detail Page

American Journal of Physics
written by Ian D. Beatty, William J. Gerace, William J. Leonard, and Robert J. Dufresne
Classroom response systems can be powerful tools for teaching physics. Their efficacy depends strongly on the quality of the questions. Creating effective questions is difficult and differs from creating exam and homework problems. Each classroom response system question should have an explicit pedagogic purpose consisting of a content goal, a process goal, and a metacognitive goal. Questions can be designed to fulfill their purpose through four complementary mechanisms: directing students' attention, stimulating specific cognitive processes, communicating information to the instructor and students via classroom response system-tabulated answer counts, and facilitating the articulation and confrontation of ideas. We identify several tactics that are useful for designing potent questions and present four "makeovers" to show how these tactics can be used to convert traditional physics questions into more powerful questions for a classroom response system.
American Journal of Physics: Volume 74, Issue 1, Pages 31-39
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Active Learning
- Instructional Material Design
= Problem/Question
- Technology
= Audience Response
- High School
- Lower Undergraduate
- Reference Material
= Article
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© 2006 American Journal of Physics
DOI:
10.1119/1.2121753
NSF Numbers:
9453881
9730438
0106771
PACS:
01.40.Di
Keyword:
clickers
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 3, 2012 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
July 12, 2012 by John Stewart
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 1, 2006
Other Collections:

ComPADRE is beta testing Citation Styles!

Record Link
AIP Format
I. Beatty, W. Gerace, W. Leonard, and R. Dufresne, Am. J. Phys. 74 (1), 31 (2006), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753).
AJP/PRST-PER
I. Beatty, W. Gerace, W. Leonard, and R. Dufresne, Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching, Am. J. Phys. 74 (1), 31 (2006), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753>.
APA Format
Beatty, I., Gerace, W., Leonard, W., & Dufresne, R. (2006, January 1). Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching. Am. J. Phys., 74(1), 31-39. Retrieved September 19, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753
Chicago Format
Beatty, I, W. Gerace, W. Leonard, and R. Dufresne. "Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching." Am. J. Phys. 74, no. 1, (January 1, 2006): 31-39, http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753 (accessed 19 September 2014).
MLA Format
Beatty, Ian, William Gerace, William Leonard, and Robert Dufresne. "Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching." Am. J. Phys. 74.1 (2006): 31-39. 19 Sep. 2014 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Ian Beatty and William Gerace and William Leonard and Robert Dufresne", Title = {Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching}, Journal = {Am. J. Phys.}, Volume = {74}, Number = {1}, Pages = {31-39}, Month = {January}, Year = {2006} }
Refer Export Format

%A Ian Beatty
%A William Gerace
%A William Leonard
%A Robert Dufresne
%T Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching
%J Am. J. Phys.
%V 74
%N 1
%D January 1, 2006
%P 31-39
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Beatty, Ian
%A Gerace, William
%A Leonard, William
%A Dufresne, Robert
%D January 1, 2006
%T Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching
%J Am. J. Phys.
%V 74
%N 1
%P 31-39
%8 January 1, 2006
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2121753


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The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

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