Journal Article Detail Page

Science
written by Michelle K. Smith, William B. Wood, Wendy K. Adams, Carl E. Wieman, Jennifer K. Knight, N. Guild, and T. T. Su
When students answer an in-class conceptual question individually using clickers, discuss it with their neighbors, and then revote on the same question, the percentage of correct answers typically increases. This outcome could result from gains in understanding during discussion, or simply from peer influence of knowledgeable students on their neighbors. To distinguish between these alternatives in an undergraduate genetics course, we followed the above exercise with a second, similar (isomorphic) question on the same concept that students answered individually. Our results indicate that peer discussion enhances understanding, even when none of the students in a discussion group originally knows the correct answer.
Science: Volume 323, Issue 5910, Pages 122-124
Subjects ADS Supplements Resource Types
Education - Applied Research
- Active Learning
= Peer Instruction
- Instructional Material Design
= Problem/Question
- Technology
= Audience Response
- Reference Material
= Research study
PER User's Guide Type Levels Ratings
- PER Literature
- Lower Undergraduate
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© 2009 American Association for the Advancement of Science
DOI:
10.1126/science.1165919
Record Creator:
Metadata instance created July 9, 2012 by Sam McKagan
Record Updated:
July 10, 2012 by Lyle Barbato
Last Update
when Cataloged:
January 1, 2009
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Record Link
AIP Format
M. Smith, W. Wood, W. Adams, C. Wieman, J. Knight, N. Guild, and T. Su, Science 323 (5910), 122 (2009), WWW Document, (http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919).
AJP/PRST-PER
M. Smith, W. Wood, W. Adams, C. Wieman, J. Knight, N. Guild, and T. Su, Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions, Science 323 (5910), 122 (2009), <http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919>.
APA Format
Smith, M., Wood, W., Adams, W., Wieman, C., Knight, J., Guild, N., & Su, T. (2009, January 1). Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions. Science, 323(5910), 122-124 . Retrieved October 21, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919
Chicago Format
Smith, M, W. Wood, W. Adams, C. Wieman, J. Knight, N. Guild, and T. Su. "Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions." Science. 323, no. 5910, (January 1, 2009): 122-124 , http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919 (accessed 21 October 2014).
MLA Format
Smith, Michelle, William Wood, Wendy Adams, Carl Wieman, Jennifer Knight, N. Guild, and T. T. Su. "Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions." Science 323.5910 (2009): 122-124 . 21 Oct. 2014 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919>.
BibTeX Export Format
@article{ Author = "Michelle Smith and William Wood and Wendy Adams and Carl Wieman and Jennifer Knight and N. Guild and T. T. Su", Title = {Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions}, Journal = {Science}, Volume = {323}, Number = {5910}, Pages = {122-124 }, Month = {January}, Year = {2009} }
Refer Export Format

%A Michelle Smith
%A William Wood
%A Wendy Adams
%A Carl Wieman
%A Jennifer Knight
%A N. Guild
%A T. T. Su
%T Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions
%J Science
%V 323
%N 5910
%D January 1, 2009
%P 122-124
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919
%O application/pdf

EndNote Export Format

%0 Journal Article
%A Smith, Michelle
%A Wood, William
%A Adams, Wendy
%A Wieman, Carl
%A Knight, Jennifer
%A Guild, N.
%A Su, T. T.
%D January 1, 2009
%T Why Peer Discussion Improves Student Performance on In-Class Concept Questions
%J Science
%V 323
%N 5910
%P 122-124
%8 January 1, 2009
%U http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165919


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The AIP Style presented is based on information from the AIP Style Manual.

The AJP/PRST-PER presented is based on the AIP Style with the addition of journal article titles and conference proceeding article titles.

The APA Style presented is based on information from APA Style.org: Electronic References.

The Chicago Style presented is based on information from Examples of Chicago-Style Documentation.

The MLA Style presented is based on information from the MLA FAQ.

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